A portrait of a male hoary bat
Michael Durham/Minden Pictures, Bat Conservation International

Collaborative science-based conservation

Collaboration among diverse constituents and beyond country boundaries provides the basis for shared data collection and shared initiatives needed to guide decision-making to protect and manage the world’s bat populations. The North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) unites government agencies, researchers, and NGOs to improve the state of conservation science for bats in North America, serving as a powerful role model for collaborative and science-based bat conservation.

Objectives

INCREASE QUALITY AND QUANTITY OF DATA CONTRIBUTED TO INFORM POPULATION STATUS AND TRENDS OF NORTH AMERICAN BAT SPECIES
CONTRIBUTE TO REPORTS OF STATUS AND TRENDS OF NORTH AMERICAN BAT SPECIES MADE AVAILABLE TO DECISION MAKERS
DETERMINE REGULATORY STATUS OF BAT SPECIES BASED ON POPULATION STATUS AND TRENDS

Program Details

Bats in North America face three major threats: White-nose Syndrome (WNS), mortality from wind energy facilities, and habitat loss and degradation. Lack of information on population status and trends impedes regulatory protection and hinders targeting conservation actions for species and populations that need it most. Committing to long-term monitoring that provides accurate population status and trends is the first step in taking conservation action.

We serve as a key partner and leading contributor to the North American Bat Monitoring Program. Our team provides leadership and collaborates on research involving data collection, data processing, and analytic tools to provide robust data inputs and analytic outputs to inform the status and trends of bat populations in North America.  We work specifically on improving methods of reproducibility and scalability of monitoring data to support bat conservation efforts in North America and globally.

 
A little brown myotis is in flight over lupine stream side in Lakeview County, Oregon
Michael Durham/Minden Pictures

We’re dedicated to working with partners. Our efforts include:

  • Collaborate and improve methods for standardized data collection and dissemination to assess the status and trends of bat populations in North America
  • Conduct robust analyses and build tools that enable decision-makers to identify and achieve conservation outcomes
  • Provide leadership to unite stakeholders to collaborate as vital partners in an effort to address significant threats to North American bats – including White-nose Syndrome, wind energy development, and habitat loss

We share and leverage data to improve bat conservation across North America

 
BCI Staff Dr. Amanda Adams analyzing bat acoustic data
Kendra B. Lewellyn

NABat National Data Processing Lab (NDPL)

The NDPL is a research collaborative focused on developing scalable and reproducible data processing capabilities that aid the core mission of NABat — improving the state of conservation science for bats. NDPL collaboratively unites state and federal agencies, academic partners, and other organizations focused on developing new tools and workflows. It simultaneously addresses the need to process large volumes of acoustic data in efficient, reproducible, and cost-effective ways to support our ability to determine the status and trends of bats in North America.

This fully integrated, data processing center handles all aspects of acoustic data processing for NABat acoustic surveys. Our collaboration among BCI, NABat, and Conservation Metrics Inc. lowers barriers and the cost of participating and contributing data to NABat. Our goal is to increase efficiency and speed of contributions while providing high-quality, standardized methods, and continually advancing the field of processing acoustic data streams for informing conservation.

For more details, including pricing, see the NABat NDPL flyer.

Interested in collaborating? Contact rapid@batcon.org

Key Collaborators

Collaboration is essential for effective conservation. We work side-by-side with partners worldwide to secure lasting global conservation success.

Dr. Winifred Frick Chief Scientist
A Mexican free-tailed bat in flight
J. Scott Altenbach