The Echo
Women in Bat Conservation: Angie McIntire

The Echo

Women in Bat Conservation: Angie McIntire

Published on April 15, 2015


Angie McIntireName: Angie McIntire

Title: Statewide Bat Management Coordinator

 Organization: Arizona Game and Fish Department

What is your focus in bat research?

I have worked as the statewide bat management coordinator for 14 of my 20 years as a wildlife biologist. I knew from the first time I saw a bat up close that I wanted to work with them full time. I love the variety of work I do. Sometimes I’m out in the field catching bats or counting them as they emerge from a cave, and other times I’m working with colleagues on various initiatives to protect and conserve bat populations.  I also talk to the public about bats, and love to share how truly interesting and amazing bats are. 

How have you been involved with Bat Conservation International?

I’ve enjoyed working with Bat Conservation International for many years. Most recently we collaborated to obtain grants for bat conservation work across the west. Together, we’ve received grants totaling more than a million dollars to monitor white-nose syndrome and to conduct acoustic surveys for the North American Bat Monitoring Program. 

AngieWhat is the most satisfying part of your involvement with bat research?

Studying bats is a passion of mine. One of the most satisfying parts of my job is the opportunity to do what I love and to work with others who make a difference for bats and wildlife conservation. 

What is the most amazing thing you have leant about bats?

There’s so much to be fascinated about, it’s hard to narrow it down. I love the unique adaptations each species has. I JUST learned the Hardwicke’s woolly bat of Borneo roosts in pitcher plants. And recently watched a slow motion video to show how a bat lands on the ceiling of a cave. It was incredible how it slowed and did an upside down flip to land gently on the ceiling.  

Do you have any advice for people who want to get involved in bat conservation?

You might find opportunities with your State Wildlife Agency or a local conservation organization. Many states have bat working groups and you can get on their email lists to find out about opportunities. Get experience however you can. Look for opportunities to volunteer and apply for internships. 

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