Media & Education
News Room

Volume 14, Issue 2, Summer 1996

ON THE COVER


A MEXICAN LONG-TONGUED BAT (Choeronycteris mexicana) licks pollen from its face after feeding on nectar from agaves and other plants. These bats' tongues can extend up to a third of their body length, a feature which makes them uniquely equipped to reach nectar deep inside an agave or cactus blossom. In southern Arizona, long-tongued bats often get nectar from neighborhood hummingbird feeders as well.

In the United States this species is found in the southern parts of California, New Mexico, and Arizona. Their range extends from Mexico through Central America and down to Venezuela. The young are born well-furred for additional warmth in the cool mountain canyons where this species roosts.

Photo by Merlin D. Tuttle

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