Types of Giving
Planned Giving

Planned Giving

By making a planned gift, you can make a significant gift to BCI to address some of the world's most pressing issues facing bats and their ecosystems—and gain financial and tax benefits for you and your family.

Bequests

Bequests (specific, residuary, and contingent gifts made by will) are the most popular type of planned gift. Whether you wish to provide general operating income for BCI to use wherever it is most needed (which provides the most flexibility) or to support a specific program, your bequest expresses your lasting commitment to BCI. A bequest may also help you meet your financial and estate-planning goals since an estate-tax charitable deduction for the entire amount of the gift is allowed.

The official bequest language for Bat Conservation International is:

“I, ____(name)_____, of ( city, state, zip) give, devise and bequeath to Bat Conservation International (written amount or percentage of the estate or description of property) for its unrestricted use and purpose.”

The legal designation for Bat Conservation International is:

Bat Conservation International, a nonprofit organization organized under the laws of Austin, Texas, with its principal office at 500 N. Capital of Texas Hwy, Building 1, Suite 200, Austin, TX 78746.

The  U.S federal tax identification number for Bat Conservation International is: Tax ID# 74-2553144

For more information, please visit www.batcon.org and click on Membership & Support > Types of Giving > Planned Giving. Or contact Chris Daniels, at (512) 327-9721 x14 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Trusts

Charitable remainder trusts allow you to make a gift to BCI and at the same time retain a benefit from the assets you give. These separately managed trusts can be tailored to meet your financial goals with respect to the payout rate, type of income stream (variable or fixed), and payment schedule. To establish a remainder trust, you make an irrevocable contribution of cash, securities, or other property, which is placed in trust. The trust pays an income stream to one or more named beneficiaries (which can include you) for life and/or for a set term of years and BCI receives the right to principal as a remainder interest. The two most common types of charitable remainder trust are: (1) the annuity trust, which pays a fixed dollar amount each year based on a percentage of the initial fair market value of the trust assets; and (2) the unitrust, which pays a variable income stream based on a percentage of the fair market value of trust assets as revalued each year. A deferral feature is available for charitable remainder unitrusts. Because charitable remainder trusts (like an IRA or 401(k)) are tax-exempt, this deferral feature can make them a useful retirement planning tool if you are in a position to defer your receipt of an income stream. Charitable remainder trusts are typically funded with assets worth $100,000 or more. Establishing such a trust generally entitles you to claim an immediate income-tax charitable deduction. You should consult with your financial, tax, and legal advisors for more information on charitable remainder trusts as they pertain to your particular situation and needs.

All trusts are administered in conjunction with the Austin Community Foundation. Please contact Chris Daniels, at (512) 327-9721 x14 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information about charitable trusts.

Charitable Lead Trusts

A charitable lead trust is the reverse of a charitable remainder trust; the gift to BCI is the income stream from the trust, not the remainder. Charitable lead trusts enable you to provide an income stream immediately for a set term of years or for a term measured by one or more lifetimes after which the trust assets pass to you or your estate or to your heirs. Leaving the asset to heirs can significantly reduce the gift or estate tax that would otherwise apply. If you think a charitable lead trust could be a useful way to structure a gift to BCI, you should review the alternatives for structuring the trust with your financial, tax, and legal advisors.

All trusts are administered in conjunction with the Austin Community Foundation. Please contact Chris Daniels, at (512) 327-9721 x14 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information about charitable trusts.

Retirement Plan Assets

Assets in qualified (tax-deferred) retirement plans may represent a large portion of your total assets and therefore may be an important factor in planning testamentary charitable gifts. Retirement assets generally considered suitable for charitable gifts include such plans as IRAs, Keoghs, SEPs, 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and ESOPs.

Left to family members or friends, these assets are subject to income tax and may also be subject to estate tax and generation skipping transfer tax. Because of this potential double layer of tax, retirement plan assets may be particularly attractive as an asset to leave to BCI. In other words, if you designate Bat Conservation International as a beneficiary upon your death of all or a specified percentage of a retirement plan, the portion of the plan payable to BCI will generally escape estate taxes, and BCI, as a tax-exempt institution, will not be required to pay income tax on the distributions. As a general rule, if you intend to make both non-charitable and charitable gifts at death, it makes sense to consider using your tax-deferred retirement plan assets for charity and other assets for heirs. If you are thinking about donating retirement plan assets to BCI, you should discuss the matter with your advisors beforehand.

The official language to designate Bat Conservation International as a beneficiary is:

The beneficiary is my spouse as long as he/she survives me. The beneficiary of any amount(s) remaining in the plan upon my death if my spouse does not survive me, or of any portion thereof that my spouse may disclaim, is Bat Conservation International, a nonprofit organization organized under the laws of Texas, with its principal office at 500 N. Capital of Texas Hwy, Building 1, Suite 200, Austin, TX 78746.”

Life Insurance Policies

Naming the Bat Conservation International the beneficiary of an existing life insurance policy that is no longer needed to provide for dependents offers a simple way to support BCI. Since you are the policy owner, the value of the policy will be included in your estate, but an offsetting estate-tax charitable deduction will generally be allowed. You may also be able to assign an existing whole life policy to BCI, irrevocably making us the owner and beneficiary, and claim an income-tax charitable deduction for the lesser of either your basis in the policy or its fair market value in that year. If the policy is not paid up and additional premium payments are due, you may donate cash or the equivalent to BCI to pay the premiums each year and claim a full tax deduction for the gift.

If you are considering donating a life insurance policy to BCI, it is important that you consult your advisors about the possible state law restrictions on such a gift and about the amount of the charitable deduction you can expect to receive.

The official language to designate Bat Conservation International as a beneficiary on your life insurance policy is:

The beneficiary is my spouse as long as he/she survives me. The beneficiary of any amount(s) remaining in the plan upon my death if my spouse does not survive me, or of any portion thereof that my spouse may disclaim, is Bat Conservation International, a nonprofit organization organized under the laws of Texas, with its principal office at 500 N. Capital of Texas Hwy, Building 1, Suite 200, Austin, TX 78746.”

BCI relies on the support of our amazing members around the world.

Our mission is to conserve the world’s bats and their ecosystems to ensure a healthy planet.

Please join us or donate so our work can continue.